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This is utterly delectable.

Chicken Congee

Here is a congee made with chicken, garnished with scallions, coriander, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil and white pepper. You may use the carcasses from pheasant or turkey as well.

Ingredients

1 chicken (3 pounds), cut up 
1 cup raw extra-long-grain rice
3 quarts water
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon peanut, vegetable, or corn oil
1/2 cup finely chopped scallions, green part included
1/2 cup finely chopped coriander
1/2 cup finely shredded fresh ginger
1/2 cup light soy sauce
1/2 cup sesame oil
Ground white pepper

Instructions

1. Cut up the chicken Remove the gizzard, liver, and heart and discard or reserve for another use.
2. Drop the chicken pieces into boiling water to cover and let simmer 2 minutes. Drain immediately and run under cold running water, then drain again.
3. Rinse the rice well in cold water and drain. Put it into a kettle with the 3 quarts of water. Bring to a boil and add salt and the tablespoon of oil. Add the blanched chicken pieces and return to a boil. Cover partially and simmer 1 hour.
4. Take out the legs, thighs and breast of the chicken. Leave in the remaining pieces and let the congee continue to cook, partially covered, 1 to 1 1/2 hours longer.
5. Meanwhile, finely shred the chicken breast and put the meat into a small serving bowl. Return the skin and bones to the kettle.
6. Remove the skin and bones from the legs and thighs and return the skin and bones to the kettle. Shred the meat and put this into another small serving bowl.
7. When the congee is ready to serve, remove and discard the skin and bones, ladle the gruel into individual serving bowls. Serve with shredded chick, white and dark meat in the two bowls, and the scallions, coriander, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil, and white pepper on the side.
Let each guest help himself. The soy sauce and sesame oil should be used sparingly.

The Chinese Cookbook
Craig Clairborne and Virginia Lee